Stormwater management for Ashmead Channel

Stormwater management for Ashmead Channel

The Knysna Estuary is often referred to as one of the most biodiverse and iconic estuaries in South Africa and is home to the critically endangered Knysna Seahorse. Poor land use practices, urban development as well as industrial and municipal discharge all contribute a significant amount of pollution to the Ashmead Channel which receives much of its runoff from urbanised and environmentally degraded areas such as the N2 roadway, Knysna CBD and the semi-formal settlements at the headwaters of the northern and eastern catchments of the estuary. Ashmead Channel is currently facing the brunt of the impacts of urbanisation, is considered eutrophic (high nutrient and low oxygen levels) and is host to a persistent algal bloom (dominated by Ulva spp.),...

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Jonas Haller shares his South African experience

Jonas Haller Knysna Basin Project

“All Life is an Experiment. The more Experiments you make the better!” (Ralph Waldo Emerson) My time in Knysna was one of the best experiences I had in my life. I can still remember the day when I stepped onto the plane, uncertain but expectant about my research project at the Knysna Basin Project. It was the first time that I travelled to South Africa, but now I can say it fulfilled my expectations completely. I directly fell in love with the beautiful landscape, the nature and also with the warm-hearted people. Everyone was so pleasant and helpful to me and I always had the feeling I am more than welcome in their country. (more…)

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Keurbooms: a fishy tale

Keurbooms Estuary

I completed my Bachelor of Science degree in zoology and ichthyology as well as my honours in marine biology at Rhodes University. The ocean has always been a special place to me, searching through rock pools and with an eye kept on the horizon for whales I spent many hours getting sand between my toes and salt in my hair. Recently I began my masters, through Rhodes University, and my passion for marine work has brought me to the Keurbooms Estuary. (more…)

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Knysna Estuary ShoreSearch Update

We have now completed at least 3 full assessments using transects and quadrats with the help of our volunteers on our 12 sites around the estuary, including a number on the western shore. So we have a mass of data to collate and analyse and I have spent a busy time during the long, hot English summer (we are ‘swallows’) pulling this together and I am aiming to start producing reports in the new year. (more…)

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Wondering how pollution affects the estuary?

Knysna Estuary pollution

Plastic bottles, coffee cups and plastic packets, just some of the litter scooped up by the fantastic team working for SANParks, collecting litter before it gets into the Knysna Estuary. These aren’t the only pollutants that flow down our rivers and streams and reach the sea life in the estuary. Oils, grease and heavy metals like zinc and lead can be washed off roads or flushed into rivers by irresponsible industrial users. Nitrogen and Phosphorous rich water can originate from sewage spills from burst pipes or residents and farmers using too much fertiliser on gardens and crops. Think before you wash anything into the stormwater drains because chances are this will end up in the rivers and finally the estuary!...

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Have you seen the horses under the sea?

Knysna Seahorse Project

Sometimes, we don’t realise the curiosities that could be found right at our doorstep, all you must do is look. If you ever find yourself around the Thesen Island Marina in Knysna, be sure to look out for a little boat chugging along with a couple of students and a pool net on board. They’re not there to scoop leaves out of the Marina, I’m afraid, but rather to look for an illusive little fish known as the Knysna seahorse (Hippocampus capensis). (more…)

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Keurbooms Seahorse Research Project

Keurbooms Seahorse Research Project

My past twenty years of research work at sea involved taking along bins of equipment -glassware, chemicals, oceanographic instruments, batteries and spares for everything. So, walking down to the Keurbooms Estuary for this month’s seahorse survey with all my sampling gear inside a small rucksack, feels minimalistic to say the least. The 50m Research vessel has now been replaced by a canoe, and with my family as crew we set off on an ebbing tide to search for Knysna seahorses, albeit in the Keurbooms Estuary. This is one of the few localities other than Knysna, that this endangered species calls home. (more…)

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What lies beneath

What lies beneath by Johan Wasserman

Beneath the surface of the Knysna Estuary lies a rich diversity of plant and animal life which, until now, has been largely unexplored. Due to recent developments in Remote Operated Underwater Vehicle (ROV) technology, we can now discover what lies beneath our estuary. Using an ROV and Geographic Information System (GIS) software, we plan on creating a map that depicts the subtidal habitats of the Knysna Estuary. Estuarine habitats act as nursery areas for many important fish and invertebrate species, providing them with food and shelter for at least a part of their life cycle. As such, the subtidal habitats of estuaries often host diverse communities. It is important to study the distribution of these habitats for conserving and managing...

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What effect has the blanket of Ulva had on the animals of Leisure Island’s Steenbok Channel shoreline?

What effect has the blanket of Ulva had on the animals of Leisure Island's Steenbok Channel shoreline?

In early 2011, when the Steenbok Channel was clothed in a luxuriant and healthy eelgrass bed, Richard Barnes investigated its invertebrate fauna at a series of nine points (at Kingfisher Creek near its junction with the Ashmead Channel, at its head near the Armstrong Causeway, and at a point halfway between the two, adjacent to the Reserve's Indigenous Garden; and at three points down the shore at each of those three sites - low water neap, mean low water, and low water spring).  Early this year, he sampled those same nine points again but in 2018 in areas of bare mud left after loss of the seagrass.  This was a race against time before the bare mud itself disappeared under...

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