Progress on identification of the Moonshine baitworm in Knysna Estuary

Progress on identification of the Moonshine baitworm in Knysna Estuary

The Moonshine worm, a popular bait worm that can be found almost anywhere in the Knysna Estuary, now most likely seems to be an alien species. Our work started owing to a rise in popularity in use of the Moonshine worm as bait among local fishermen. Further investigation showed that these worms were not found within the Knysna Estuary during the 1950’s and 90’s, during extensive ecological surveys. This provides strong circumstantial evidence that these worms moved into the Knysna Estuary some time during the last two decades. The question that arose was whether the worms moved in from another local area, such as a nearby estuary or the ocean floor, or whether it was brought here from elsewhere. (more…)

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Water quality monitoring in the Knysna estuary

KEMP Knysna Basin Project

The winter of 2017 was somewhat drawn out, cold and occasionally wet which fortunately did not interfere with the necessary sampling of the estuary water column in the vicinity of Thesen Jetty.  At this site KEMP, a part of the overall Knysna Basin Project had set up a Hach Ott multiparameter sonde well below the surface at low water and delivered real time changes in dissolved oxygen acidity (pH), water levels, and measured chla fluorometrically (digitally). (more…)

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Sea Star Sundays

The Spiny sea star Marthasterias glacialis

The Spiny sea star Marthasterias glacialis is widely distributed. However, the South African Marthasterias population has been reclassified as Marthasterias africana. These critters were easy to spot with their vibrant orange and purple colourings and their arms covered in small spines. The spread of M. africana within The Knysna Estuary is suspected to be because of the invasive mussel species Mytilus galloprovincialis, as it is the sea star’s main source of food. (more…)

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